1. Prosthetic for a dry plant



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I made a prosthetic for a dry plant using a plastic lollipop stick I found on the street.


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2. Prosthetic for a piece of raw glass



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I made a prosthetic for a piece of raw glass I found in a deserted glass factory in Bucharest, Romania, using a piece of yellow plasticine.


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3. Prosthetic for a broken stone



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I made a prosthetic for a broken stone I found near a lake in the Moara Vlasiei area, north of Bucharest, Romania. The piece of wood is 14 x 10 x 0,8 cm.


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4. Bird cage





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A fully equipped bird cage, left open, placed in one of the roofless circular rooms of Fort 13, where canons used to be installed when the building first opened around 1890. This place is also known as the Jilava Prison from Bucharest, Romania. It is a landmark of Romanian modern history, as most of the political prisoners in the country have spent some jail time in this place.





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The fort became a prison in 1907, when peasants who rebelled against their landlords were incarcerated here by the state. It ended its history as a political detention place in 1989 with its last prisoners - the participants in the Revolution of 1989.


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5. Street Sign



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In 2009 I spent six months in Venice, Italy. I arrived in June and left in November. It was one of the lonesome periods in my life. Around me, everyone seemed to have someone to take photos with, to spend money with, to kiss and hold hands, and so on.


Venice is a romantic city for some. For me it was not.



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During a walk between Fondamente dela Misericordia and Campo San Marziale in the Cannaregio neighborhood, I found an empty street sign. Using a stencil, I wrote 'De unul singur' (All by myself) in Romanian, with the typeface that is commonly used for street names and bridges.


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6. Earrings



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I made a pair of earrings using my own mucus, by removing the Murano glass from the iron rods, and then replacing it with my own secretion, which took two weeks to collect. A group of young Italian curators had invited me to take part in a show called 'Live Economy Lesson' while living in Venice, Italy, in 2009. The show was to take place in the studio of Cesare Pietroiusti in Rome.

They were interested to create a small-scale market of artworks that would be distributed to the public. However, I felt that their underlying assumption - the fact that everyone will want the objects - could be challenged.



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This is why I decided to produce an object that would provoke revulsion, rather than attraction. Moreover, I would only give the pair of earrings to someone who would wear them for 10 minutes. To my surprise, it took only 15 minutes before someone agreed to wear them, and thus became their owner.


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7. Coca Cola



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The hammer and sickle out of 31 Coca Cola cans, within the premises of the Electroaparataj factory in Bucharest, Romania.



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The factory was being demolished in order to build a Mall. The cans were abandoned on location, on the first day of Easter 2009. They were probably found by the demolition workers in the following days, or by the people who trespass to steal iron pieces from the building, and then sell it to recycling points. During Communism, Electroaparataj produced electric home appliances, being similar in output but not in quality to Western brands like Siemens.


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8. Funeral Wreaths



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The action took place one day after the Independence Day of the Republic of Moldova and four days after the commemoration of Moldavia’s liberation by the Soviet Army. This was a moment when these ceremonial gestures reached their highest frequency within public space.


We wore two funeral wreaths as backpacks between the most important statues in the city of Chisnau, Republic of Moldova. The starting point was the statue of Stephen the Great in the proximity of the Republic of Moldova Government building.



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Then, we went to Lenin’s statue from the Moldexpo Park. We finished our tour at the empty pedestal of a monument that was being restored in front of the History Museum in Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. Authors: Vlad Nanca, Mircea Nicolae. Within Interventii3, a project for art in public space, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. Photos by Michele Bressan.


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9. Flower bridge



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The flag of the European Union, the flag of the Republic of Moldova, two wooden poles set up and abandoned on the banks of the small river that flows through the middle of the dry lake from the Valea Morilor Park in Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. The lake was emptied of water approximately two years ago, and it is said that it will be the place where a future residential complex will be built.



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The members of the local Comsomol (the youth organization of the Communist Party from the Soviet Union) built this lake at the request of Leonid Brezhnev. Nowadays the lake is a wasteland, full of bushes and small trees, a landscape out of use and in a way, out of history.



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The Flower Bridge was created on the 6th of May 1990, within the “Flower bridge across the Prut river” action, organized by the “Association of free Romanians from across the globe”, the Popular Front from the Republic of Moldova and the Bucharest-Chisinau Cultural Association.


This was a symbolic gesture celebrating the liberation of Romanians living in Moldova from the Soviet rule. It also pointed out the possibility of an eventual union between the Romanian state and the Republic of Moldova.



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Today, the Flower Bridge no longer exists in the symbolic imagination of these two countries, and Romanian or Moldavian authorities never mention it. Rather than being nostalgic about a past state of affairs, this intervention highlights the process of creating symbolic objects with abstract existence by the nationalist discourse.


Once they have lived their lives and served their purpose, they are silently withdrawn from collective consciousness, thus becoming mental relics, as they are no longer kept alive by the ideology that brought them into existence.


Authors: Nicoleta Esinencu, Vlad Nanca, Mircea Nicolae. Within Interventii3, a project for art in public space, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova. Photos by Vlad Nanca.


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10. One hundred interventions in public and deserted spaces


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Between May 5, 2007 and November 25, 2009, I made one hundred interventions in a series of urban spaces. This was my first project. The word intervention was used very broadly, encompassing performances, temporary sculptures, symbolic gestures, running a home gallery, and promoting 33 young Romanian artists during the Venice Biennale 2009.


To read the statement and go through the archive, go here.



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