x

.

In August 2011 I went to the Buzesti Street in Bucharest and I threw some money on the way between Calea Serban Voda and Piata Victoriei.

.
.
.
Motivation

I had 70 bills of 10 RON in my wallet, amounting to a total of 700 RON, which was the minimum wage at the time. I placed the bills under the pieces of brick, under the stones, or between the curb slabs I found on my way. I also placed them into sand piles and into holes and puddles, or I threw them into the open doors of the houses that were being demolished.

After a while I was followed on my path by some people who still live in the area. They will probably not be there for long, because in the end the old inhabitants will be pushed toward the edge of the city by the gentrification process associated with the expansion of the office buildings near Piata Victoriei.


My intention was to underline the obscenity of the public works that were in progress, which were only fueled by the need of the mayor - Dr. Oprescu - to spend some public money and make large-scale public works which would ensure his re-election.

There was no connection between the needs of the city and this project. The plan had been imagined before the Revolution of 1989. As it was customary back then, it included the wholesale demolition of the area, even if it had a strong historical character. The final aim of the works was to build a larger road to ease increasing traffic. This motivation was argued against by contemporary city planners, who said that larger roads only lead to more traffic.


Furthermore, the study that the City Hall commissioned from Architect Hanna Derrer for the occasion specifically stated that a modernization of the site would not be useful for the city, and the demolition of the buildings would further the cultural impoverishment of the built space.

However, the works started and the total budget was never made available to the public. Some estimates for the works in 2011 ranged around 30 million Euro.


In the end, an enormous amount of public funds were used for the works, that part of the city was demolished to make way for a larger boulevard, the project was not completed, and the most basic needs of the city and of its inhabitants were largely disregarded.


x

x